University of Wisconsin–Madison

John J. Curtin, Ph.D.

Professor, Director of Clinical Training

jjcurtin@wisc.edu

608-262-0387

Office: 326 Psychology

John Curtin

Ph.D., Florida State University, 2000
Clinical Internship, Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Program, 2000
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1991

Curriculum Vitae

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I am a clinical psychologist who has substantial expertise in the use of pharmacological manipulations and psychophysiological, behavioral, and self-report measures of affective processes in preclinical and clinical research in addiction. As noted elsewhere, my program of research focuses on the role of stress mechanisms in the etiology and treatment of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders. More recently, we have begun to exploit emerging mHealth capabilities on mobile devices to dynamically monitor and predict AOD relapse in patients following treatment. My research has been continuously funded by NIAAA, NIDA, NCI and NIMH since 1998.

I have substantial expertise in quantitative and research methods. I have served as a statistical consultant on numerous empirical papers and extramural grants in the social and medical sciences. I teach a two semester graduate course on General, Generalized, and Multilevel Mixed Effects Linear Models. I have chaired the Society for Psychophysiological Research’s Education and Training committee, served on their Board of Directors, and regularly offered training workshops at their annual meeting.

I have recently served as a regular member of the Risk, Prevention and Intervention for Addictions (RPIA) NIH study section and participate ad hoc on other study sections. I have served as our department’s Associate Chair and continue to serve as the Director of Clinical Training since 2008. I am also a consulting editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. I am a fellow in the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and received a Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association (APA).

I have mentored numerous NIH Emotion training grant (T31), NIH National Research Service Award (NRSA; F31), and National Science Foundation (NSF) fellows including J. Hogle (R36, T31), R. Gloria (T31), C. Moberg (T31, NRSA), K. Hefner (T31, NRSA), M. Starr (T31), D. Bradford (T31), and J. Kaye (NSF, NRSA).